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Former Accessories Editors, Kate Davidson Hudson and Stefania Allen, found a hole in the accessories market and filled it by creating Editorialist. Featured in some of the most-read publications, this magazine/online shopping destination is filled with the most coveted and hard to find pieces that they spotted on the runway and designer market appointments. Thanks ladies for feeding our shopping addiction and putting all of the best accessories in one place! Major plus, if you live in NYC, they offer same day delivery #BLESS

editorialist

We didn’t feel there was any single destination that satisfied our need for both quality content and quality product. It was at that point we thought, if it doesn’t exist, let’s build it.

What was the tipping point that took Editorialist from something you both wanted to see in the market personally to something you felt you needed create? What pushed you into the startup world?

As editors we always lamented that so many of the incredible pieces we saw in market appointments and Europe covering the shows, never actually made it to store shelves. A lot of what we saw at our common retail locations were either watered-down versions of the key pieces of the season, or, felt like very redundant iterations from store-to-store. At the same time, we slowly began to realize that we, personally, preferred shopping online and reading our fashion media online within the hectic pace of our day-to-day working lives. It was at that point that we thought to ourselves, there has to be a more efficient way to consume our media and shop in one streamlined environment. We didn’t feel there was any single destination that satisfied our need for both quality content and quality product. It was at that point we thought, if it doesn’t exist, let’s build it.

I know as an editor it was always frustrating to see such great pieces on the line and then they would be dropped. What is your process like to get such great stuff  on your site? How do you work with designers to ensure you get the selects?

We’re fortunate in the sense that we come from the editorial world, so we have the benefit of years of cultivating our eye and being able to spot talent along with those quality directional pieces that will be great investments for someone’s wardrobe. We love to work with designers on exclusive pieces – whether it be an entirely new product or simply an exclusive colorway, we have a sense of what will be important in the market moving forward and if we don’t see those ideas already commercialized in samples, we work to create it with our partners to ensure we’re bringing the best and most investment-worthy product to our readers every season.

You launched Editorialist magazine after a few seasons online. What was this experience like and how do you see it compliment the site?

We launched as a pure digital entity. But, like most early businesses, we came to learn that the plan is constantly changing and evolving to fit with the market and what your customer wants. We always understood that content and the contextualization of the product on our ecommerce platform was critical in adding to the experiential value of our site and in underscoring the importance of the pieces across the platform. After our first year, we were getting such strong engagement with our editorial content that we decided to print a small run of an issue. Initially, we were approaching it as something more akin to a pamphlet that was an outgrowth of the content we were already creating for the digital platform. But, that first issue took off and we quickly learned that our customer and reader wanted the Editorialist experience accessible at every point throughout their day: digitally, socially, via live chat, and in print. We both came from a print background so we inherently understood the value of a tangible asset, but in our digitally-driven world, we were very surprised to see that print, if done the right way, can still have a huge draw and value-add for our audience.

editorialist

It is game-changing to have another mother as a business partner. It can, understandably, be a hard thing for a non-parent co-worker to understand the urgency of a run to the pediatrician or the unpredictability of it all. As two mothers, we both get it and can step in to cover for the other without a moment’s hesitation or a second guess.

What has it been like building your team from the ground up? Growing pains?

It’s been a great learning experience growing our team. I think the two things we’ve learned are: Hire the “all-around-athletes”. Meaning, particularly in a start-up environment, you need to hire for those team players who are ready and able to wear many different hats, are excited about the product, and not afraid to get their hands dirty. The second, perhaps harder thing we’ve learned is that once you realize someone is not going to be a fit, it’s better for them and for the company to part ways, right away.

Best business advice you have ever received?

Hire to your weaknesses.

How has your business model changed from the early days? How is it the same?

We initially launched as a digital-only entity. Now, print has become an increasingly important component of our product and the Editorialist experience.

editorialist

Hire the “all-around-athletes”. Meaning, particularly in a startup environment, you need to hire for those team players who are ready and able to wear many different hats, are excited about the product, and not afraid to get their hands dirty.

How do you split your responsibilities? How did you decide to create your roles since you both come from similar backgrounds?

There is a heavy cross-pollination in what we both do; but, as general roles, Stef oversees the e-commerce and Kate runs the editorial.

Best part of what you do?

The best part of what we do is having the opportunity to work with amazingly talented and innovative people from the creative, design, and technology worlds.

You see the best of the best out there. What are you personally lusting after right now?

The list is too long – or probably too embarrassing- to note in full. But, log on to editorialist.com for a look at some of our most lust-worthy pieces from the fall collections. We only buy into what we love and can authentically stand behind, so the site is populated with all of our most coveted pieces of the season.

editorialist

You both have pretty young ( and super adorable kids) how do you manage the juggle as working mamas? Do you find it helpful to have an other mom as a co-founder to lean on?

It is a juggling act on a day-to-day basis. I’m not sure you ever find a true balance. Everyday ends up presenting its own set of challenges and I just try to focus on my kids whenever I am with them and make sure they always know they are the priority. When I’m at work, I try to be fully present there and work as efficiently as possible, so I’m getting the most value out of every moment spent at the office.

It is game-changing to have another mother as a business partner. It can, understandably, be a hard thing for a non-parent co-worker to understand the urgency of a run to the pediatrician or the unpredictability of it all. As two mothers, we both get it and can step in to cover for the other without a moment’s hesitation or a second guess.

Do guys still spend a lot of time together outside of work?

We do… our kids are great friends so it’s nice to take those opportunities to also get them together…and maybe squeeze in a little work talk along the way 😉

Our three pearls of wisdom about Motherhood:

1. Cherish the little moments- it’s often in those small, everyday moments you create the most treasured memories.
2. Be the example you want your kids to follow.
2. You’re doing better than you think you are…2016-08-22-fw_16_coverrgb

Editorialist

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